Share:
Sleep Education


American Academy of Sleep Medicine 
  

 
 

http://school.sleepeducation.com

Find a Center
Use the following fields to locate sleep centers in your area.



Search radius:

News

  • What’s preventing adequate teen sleep

    Jul 26 2017...
    Sleep is important for everyone – especially growing and developing teenagers. However, many teens struggle to get enough sleep, myself included. What is stopping teens from sleeping enough? READ MORE>>
  • Winners of high school video contest show how sleep recharges teens

    May 25 2017...
    Three students have been chosen as winners of the 2017 American Sleep Medicine Foundation “Sleep Recharges You” High School Video Contest, which focused on motivating teens to prioritize the importance of sleep in their lives.
    READ MORE>>
  • Later school start times for students

    Apr 20 2017...
    Middle and high school students have to balance academics, sports, social lives, and additional extracurricular activities. Keeping up with these responsibilities leaves minimal time for relaxing, let alone getting a good night’s sleep. READ MORE>>
  • Sleep Recharges You: Enter the 2017 high school video contest

    Nov 14 2016...
    Teens have until February 20 to enter the 2017 Sleep Recharges You High School Video Contest. Sponsored by the American Sleep Medicine Foundation, the contest invites teens to make and submit a creative video about the importance of sleep. Up for grabs is a first-place prize of $1,000 – split evenly between the winning student and his or her school. READ MORE>>
  • Help your teen recharge with sleep

    Aug 16 2016...
    The National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project has launched the “Sleep Recharges You” campaign, urging teens to make sleep a top priority. Parents and teachers can play an important role by helping teens to understand the importance of sleep.

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommends that teens should sleep 8 to 10 hours each night to promote optimal health. But CDC data show that insufficient sleep is common among teens. About 69 percent of high school students report sleeping 7 hours or less on school nights. READ MORE>>
  • High school video contest winners share their “sleep stories”

    May 18 2016...
    The American Sleep Medicine Foundation (ASMF) recently challenged high school students around the country to create a video sleep story. Over 30 aspiring scientists and filmmakers answered their call, submitting documentaries, dramas and other creative takes on sleep topics. A panel of sleep physicians and researchers had the challenging job of narrowing the field down to a winner and several runners-up. READ MORE>>
  • High school video contest: Promoting sleep awareness

    Jan 12 2016...
    High school students have until February 29 to enter the 2016 Sleep Story Video Contest. Sponsored by the American Sleep Medicine Foundation, the contest invites teens to make and submit a creative video about the importance of sleep. READ MORE>>
  • Spring forward, sleep less: Teens and daylight saving time

    Oct 05 2015...
    A new study shows that high school students lose sleep on school nights after the spring change to daylight saving time. The study involved 35 high school students. They had an average age of 16.5 years. Their nightly sleep was measured by wrist actigraphy. READ MORE>>
  • Teen video contest promotes sleep awareness

    Jan 13 2015...
    High school students have one more month to enter the 2015 Sleep Story Video Contest. Sponsored by the American Sleep Medicine Foundation, the contest invites teens to make a creative video about the importance of sleep. Up for grabs is a grand prize of $1,000 – split evenly between the winning student and his or her school. Second and third-place prizes of $500 and $250 also will be awarded.

    Video entries must be between 30 seconds and 2 minutes in length. Entries must be received by Feb. 9, 2015. Jack Gentempo, a homeschool student from Norway, Maine, won the 2014 grand prize with his video, “The Wonderful World of Sleep.” READ MORE>>
  • Teens with earlier school start times have higher crash rates

    Nov 28 2014...
    A new study suggests that teen drivers who start class earlier in the morning are involved in more car accidents than peers with a later school start time.

    The study analyzed data from the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles. It compared teen crash rates in two nearby counties during two school years. One county had a high school start time of 7:20 a.m. Classes in the other county began at 8:45 a.m. READ MORE>>