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Sleep apnea check a must in Diabetes, Hypertension

Filed in
  • Hypertension
  • diabetes
  • Sleep apnea

By Lynn Celmer  |  Jun 18, 2013
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The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) is advising anyone with Type 2 diabetes or hypertension to be evaluated for sleep apnea by a board-certified sleep medicine physician.

“Type 2 diabetics and people with hypertension are much more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea than other people, and as a result should immediately discuss their risk for sleep apnea with a sleep specialist,” said M. Safwan Badr, MD, president of AASM. “Diagnosis and treatment of sleep apnea from a board-certified sleep medicine physician will promote improvement in these conditions – including improved insulin sensitivity, blood pressure and cholesterol.”

Overwhelming clinical evidence has shown that patients suffering from two very common illnesses – Type 2 diabetes and hypertension – are at much higher risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a dangerous condition characterized by episodes of complete or partial airway obstruction during sleep. Research also has shown that treating sleep apnea can help in the management of these two disorders.

Type 2 Diabetes and Obstructive Sleep Apnea
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 25.6 million Americans aged 20 years or older suffer from diabetes, and Type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases. Seven in 10 people with Type 2 diabetes also have obstructive sleep apnea, and the severity of the sleep disorder directly impacts diabetes symptoms; the more severe a diabetic’s untreated sleep apnea, the poorer their glucose control.

“Treating sleep apnea in diabetics improves nighttime glucose levels and insulin sensitivity,” said Badr. “Treatment also will provide benefits of improved sleep unrelated to diabetes – including increased alertness during the day and improved memory and cognitive function.”

Hypertension and Obstructive Sleep Apnea
High blood pressure, known as hypertension, is the most important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is not limited to diabetes sufferers. A staggering 67 million Americans have high blood pressure, which is about one in every three adults. Between 30 and 40 percent of adults with high blood pressure also have sleep apnea, which is even more prevalent in those with resistant hypertension. Approximately 80 percent of patients that do not respond to hypertensive medications have sleep apnea. Seeking and adhering to sleep apnea treatment is a proven means of decreasing blood pressure.

“Evidence shows that sleep apnea treatment lowers nighttime and daytime blood pressure, with the greatest improvement in patients seeking treatment for moderate to severe sleep apnea,” said Badr. “The higher your blood pressure, the greater your risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke. Reducing your blood pressure lowers your risk of cardiovascular disease and improves your overall health.” 

Patients suffering from Type 2 diabetes or hypertension should discuss their risk for obstructive sleep apnea with a board-certified sleep medicine physician, who can oversee their diagnosis and prescribe the most appropriate treatment. The team of health care professionals at an AASM-accredited sleep center works individually with patients to ensure long-term treatment effectiveness. To find a local sleep specialist or accredited sleep center, patients can visit www.sleepeducation.com


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