Share:
Sleep Education


American Academy of Sleep Medicine 
  

 
 

http://school.sleepeducation.com

Find a Center
Use the following fields to locate sleep centers in your area.



Search radius:

Highlights
How can sleep compete for kids’ attention in a new era of on-demand media?

It’s time for moms and dads to implement Bed 2.0.

Parents need to set a technology "curfew” for media devices and cell phones prior to bedtime.

Parents also should keep the TV and all Internet-connected devices out of a child’s bedroom.

Set a technology curfew to help your child sleep

Filed in
  • parenting
  • children

By Thomas M. Heffron  |  Oct 28, 2013
Email   Print


Photo of kids using iPad

In many homes bedtime can be a battle between weary parents and wound-up kids. Technology may be making this nightly tug of war even harder.

In addition to TV, DVDs, video games and computers, children have new options for interactive media. A survey shows that the percentage of children who are using mobile devices such as smartphones, iPads and other tablets is rising rapidly.

This can be a problem if the devices are used at night. They may stimulate children and increase their alertness, making it harder to fall asleep.

How can sleep compete for kids’ attention in a new era of on-demand media? Making sure that children have a consistent bedtime is a good starting point. But a bedtime is not enough.

It’s time for moms and dads to implement Bed 2.0. In addition to establishing a bedtime, parents need to develop some practical rules for media use in the home. This includes setting a technology "curfew” for media devices and cell phones prior to bedtime.

Parents also should keep the TV and all Internet-connected devices out of a child’s bedroom. It is important for the bedroom to be a calm, quiet retreat from the day’s activities.

It is possible for parents to win the bedtime battle. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine provides these Bed 2.0 tips to help parents reconnect young children with sleep:
  • Shield your child from violent or scary media content.
  • Keep the TV, computer, video games and mobile devices out of your child’s bedroom.
  • Limit your child’s “screen time” in the evening.
  • Set a regular bedtime for your child.
  • Set a technology curfew at least 30 minutes before bedtime.
  • Establish a relaxing bedtime routine with your child.
Talk to a doctor or contact an AASM accredited sleep center if your child has an ongoing or severe sleep problem.

Image courtesy of Wayan Vota.

Comment

  1.